« New York on my mind. | Main | A little too McSweeney's. »

22 July 2008

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00e5521b321c883400e5539088b48833

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference The Laundress strikes again.:

Comments

Okey-dokey. I've ordered it for the library.

Well, thank you for many kindnesses, CR!

and I am glad you liked this graphic novel, it has gathered a lot of buzz and has a great title. Actually, I liked the author's preface more than the book (he has a strange tale of being a light-skinned black kid, good ol' mom bought him a dashiki to help and things went from bad to worse -- plus he became a dad to twins, one dark and one light). Well, everyone, don't miss the preface if you pick up the book...everything in it is about perceptions vs. reality and identity. Lots of food for thought. (though, as a graphic novel, I would give it a solid 3.5 stars, B grade).

Hope you and your readers will continue to give graphic novels a read!
tl

p.s. I have seen that photo many times but never knew it was of a woman named Elizabeth Eckford, thank you for giving her name --and you are right, she looks lovely and beyond reproach.

shameful pest, but pps -- great link from your link to a Vanity Fair article on Elizabeth Eckford and Hazel Bryan, the screaming girl in the background, and how they came together:

http://www.vanityfair.com/politics/features/2007/09/littlerock200709

Lesbrarian!
Awesome. Let me know how you like it, if you get it read, okay? I don't know how much it'll circulate but I think your library collection will be richer for having it there.

Laundress!!
Thank you for mentioning the preface; a fascinating story in its own right. And after I read your second post, I was going to comment right away and mention the Vanity Fair article--wasn't it fascinating? I love Elizabeth Eckford. I only remember her name because she strikes me as one of the quiet, unsung heroes of the twentieth century, who doesn't get nearly enough credit for her quiet survival. I also loved Melba Pattillo Beals's book about the experience, Warriors Don't Cry.

The comments to this entry are closed.

Support CR: Shop at Powell's

Support CR: Shop at Amazon

Search Citizen Reader


  • WWW
    citizenreader.com
Blog powered by Typepad