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12 August 2009

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I read this about a year ago (and, strangely, yours is the second review of it I've seen today). Like you, it was the characters - Oscar's women, how they were developed, and how they related to each other - that really struck me. Glad you liked the novel!

If you got a job as a movie reviewer, on the other hand, you'd click off on those deadlines lickety-split.

Someone said lickety-split at work the other day, and the rest of us had a collective sighing moment. None of us had heard the word in ages, and it just hit everybody as something groovy and fine.

It's the little things in life that seem to make the difference.

Florinda,
I'm glad you liked it too. I thought it was a good example of fiction that could appeal to women without being ridiculously simple or stereotypical--the polar opposite of Jodi Picoult, if you will.

I know, I'm mean. But I haven't picked on her for so long, I couldn't help myself.

May I ask where you saw the other review of this book? I'd like to see that.

Bert,
You like those in-depth reviews of chick flicks? I should have written a Gerard Butler-themed review of both, as he was also in RockNRolla. Mr. CR and I have found ourselves thinking of and quoting RockNRolla all week, which is often how we know we've enjoyed a movie.

Ah, "lickety split." Thank you for sharing--I haven't heard that in ages either. Like when my co-worker from a job a million years ago said, "Oh, fooey." Perfect. It's the little things indeed.

Hi, CR! Off topic, but have you read the review (I can find it if you want) criticizing Richard Russo and his female characters? Just curious about your thoughts.

I'll also read this book!!

I have another book suggestion for you when you are trying to put off a deadline. I just finished "How I became a famous novelist" by Steve Hely. The most sarcastic, funny book about the publishing industry ever. You MUST read this. I have a good feeling you'd enjoy it. Back to my reference desk...

Here's the other review: http://amyreads.com/?p=441

She liked it too :-).

Hi Venta!
I've got to go read the Russo article yet (I've seen others talking about it and have wanted to read it), but just off the top of my head I would say that I really don't think the female characters are the draw of Russo's books. With the exception of the old neighbor lady in his "Nobody's Fool"; she was a great character. But his younger women and wives of his main characters? They seem to me to be pretty, well, caricatures isn't quite the word, but along those lines.

I like Russo anyway; but it's certainly not for the women he writes, it's for the men. What did YOU think of the article, or Russo's women in general?

Hmm. Now I will spend the day trying to think of authors who write good men and women. The only one who pops immediately to mind is Anne Tyler--which is probably one of the reasons I love her so much. She writes fantastic men and even more interesting women.

Katharine,
I've put that novel on hold. I can't wait!!

Thank you, Florinda; I didn't hear much about this book when it first came out so I'm tracking down reviews of it now. Very interesting!

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